Māori


On 6 October Māori women effectively started working for free until 2019, because of the gender pay imbalance compared with the pay of men. Per hour of work, Māori women on average receive $24.26, compared with the $31.82 received by Kiwi men. That’s a gender pay imbalance of 23.76% – and it’s even worse compared with Pākehā men, who earn on average $33.59 an hour, an imbalance of 27.78%. In just 279 days, the average Kiwi man has...

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To mark Mental Health Awareness Week, the Tertiary Education Union is calling on all tertiary institutions to make student and staff wellbeing a priority. Last year the TEU published its second state of the sector report, revealing a serious drop in staff wellbeing over the last decade. The latest set of results will be published in a third state of the sector report next year, and early analysis suggests staff wellbeing is getting...

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Hūhana Wātene is standing for Te Tumu Araki, Māori vice-president. She says “unionism has been a significant part of my life”. Her father was a watersider and her grandfather a “die-hard unionist”. She’s been active in the union for over 20 years. Hūhana is Ngāti Porou. She has worked at Unitec for 22 years and says: “The place gets into your bones.” She is an academic lecturer in Bridgepoint, a foundation programme mainly preparing...

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Bill Rogers is standing again for Te Tumu Arataki, Māori vice-president. Bill has been an architectural tutor at Northtec for nearly 20 years. Bill is Ngāpuhi and grew up in the Matawaia marae area. He is the current Tumu Arataki Māori vice-president, a Tertiary Education Union council member, executive member, co-chair of Te Tiriti Relationship Group and branch co-chair at NorthTec. “Essentially it’s a desire to carry on the work...

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The kōrero from Bill Rogers, TEU’s Te Tumu Arataki is simple, “make te reo Māori, tikanga, and Te Tiriti relationships part of every day.” Bill means it and practices what he preaches. One of my favourite kōrero he tells about normalising te reo Māori is a van trip with tauira from his architecture class from NorthTec. When music was requested, Bill lent to turn on the radio but he began singing a waiata, “Māku rā pea.” Or when...

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Hūhana Watene, TEU Tumu Āwhina, takes a look at one way of taking up the challenge of Te wiki o te reo Māori – incorporating our Union waiata into our daily communications. TEU is proactive in regards to embedding kupu Māori and kaupapa Māori into the Union’s policies, media coverage, and activities. The whāinga is to provide a safe environment to learn, practice, and share. As a Union we actively engage in te reo Māori, one of our...

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