Employment


At our wits end

At our wits end


Posted By on Oct 26, 2018

Sandra Grey, national president of the Tertiary Education Union, shares some of her experience talking with staff about what the failed market experiment in tertiary education has meant for people’s jobs.   She walked into a meeting about job losses and restructuring at her university and burst into tears. The lecturer wasn’t losing her job, but the changes meant she’d been given more teaching hours and it was just too much to bear....

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Media release – 23 October 2018 Tertiary Education Union – Te Hautū Kahurangi o Aotearoa TEU elects Michael Gilchrist as new president TEU members have elected Michael Gilchrist as their national president for the next two years. Gilchrist works at Victoria University as a Head Tutor in Philosophy and is currently completing his PhD thesis. He has previously worked in a range of capacities at the university and for the Tertiary...

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Tertiary Education Union (TEU) national president Sandra Grey and NZ Union of Students’ Associations (NZUSA) president Jonathan Gee today welcomed a new amendment to the Education Amendment Bill tabled by Green MP Chlöe Swarbrick that, if passed, will increase student and staff representation on tertiary education councils. “It is vital that MPs vote to pass this amendment and restore a strong voice for student and staff on tertiary...

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Education Minister Chris Hipkins’ decision to formally dissolve the combined council of WelTec and Whitireia and appoint a commissioner in its place is a clear sign that New Zealanders cannot afford for the current model of tertiary education provision to continue any longer, and that change is an urgent priority, the Tertiary Education Union said. Taking effect yesterday, the new commissioner Dr. Neil Barnes’ appointment highlights...

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Sharn Riggs, national secretary of the Tertiary Education Union, responds to a recent article by the chair of Universities New Zealand, Stuart McCutcheon, and reminds all vice-chancellors of their responsibility to improve tertiary education and enrich the contribution our public institutions make to society. Vice-Chancellor Stuart McCutcheon wrote recently that a loss of institutional autonomy was a possible consequence for any...

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On 6 October Māori women effectively started working for free until 2019, because of the gender pay imbalance compared with the pay of men. Per hour of work, Māori women on average receive $24.26, compared with the $31.82 received by Kiwi men. That’s a gender pay imbalance of 23.76% – and it’s even worse compared with Pākehā men, who earn on average $33.59 an hour, an imbalance of 27.78%. In just 279 days, the average Kiwi man has...

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